fuels

Will Airplanes Powered by Bacteria Ever Take off?

This has been a big week for the U.S. domestic airline industry and its embrace of environmentally-friendly biofuels. On Monday, a United Airlines jet completed the first-ever biofuel-powered commercial flight in the U.S. On Wednesday, Alaska Airlines is launching the first of 75 flights powered by a 20% biofuel blend concocted from recycled cooking oil.

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Two Additional Hurdles to Oil Independence: Fear of Inconveniences and Tax Aversion

A couple weeks ago, I sketched out an Oil Independence Plan for the United States that was based on a combined move to more efficient uses of petroleum as well as a much more aggressive move to oil- (and natural gas-) independent infrastructure, than is currently proposed in existing legislation in the US Congress. [Since posting that plan, Craig Severance has written an equally ambitious and more detailed plan which can seen here.

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When It Comes to Cars, ICE Is Still Hot

If you were to believe the mainstream media, the future of transportation is electric. And so it seems: In the coming year or two, we'll see a parade of electric vehicles (EVs), hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), and extended-range electric vehicles (EREVs) — and probably a few variations on those themes — all of which employ kilowatts where gasoline once reigned. They're coming from both the world's biggest car companies and some of the smallest.

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Are We Free to Pollute the Atmosphere? Climate Change, Wealth and Liberty - Part 2

by: Michael Hoexter

In Part 1 of this post I summarized US and worldwide efforts to create legal standards to limit GHG emissions and described the political opposition to these efforts as based on a narrow conception of liberty, negative liberty, popular among conservatives over the last three decades. I introduced two types of ethical system, deontology and utilitarianism as helpful in understanding the debates over climate legislation.

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Carbon Pricing Is Just One Piece of the Puzzle: Towards a Comprehensive Climate and Energy Policy - Part 3

by: Michael Hoexter

In part 1 of this very long blog post, I described how the current economic crisis has reversed the prestige and standing of two competing schools of economic thought that are also attached to distinct worldviews, monetarism/supply side vs. Keynesianism.

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Energy Efficiency and Energy Conservation in the Renewable Electron Economy: Summary for Policymakers Part 4

by: Michael Hoexter

In the first three parts of this series for policymakers I have reviewed how we can fairly rapidly transfer our transport energy demand from exhaustible fossil fuels to renewably generated electricity, how that electricity can be generated, and what policy instruments are available to help build the Renewable Electron Economy.

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Shrill Baby, Shrill

by: Jonathan Salem Baskin

I know that I've written about it before, but the nonsense coming from the energy lobby continues to rub me the wrong way.

Big Oil continues to run lots of glossy, very expensive branding premised on claiming that there's some conversation going on between the energy producers and the consuming public. 

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The Greening of Mobility

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The Renewable Electron Economy, Supplying Clean Energy - Summary for Policymakers Part 2

by: Michael Hoexter

In the first part of this mini-series for policymakers, I addressed the marquee issue in energy currently, finding a replacement for limited, expensive and polluting petroleum; I concluded that a three-pronged approach based on electric traction in transportation would go the furthest in reducing our dependence on petroleum.

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The (Renewable) Electron Economy as the Solution to the Oil Crisis: A Summary for Policymakers - I

by: Michael Hoexter

Lines formed at gas stations during the 1973 OPEC oil embargo. Today, in the near future, rationing is more likely to take the form of high prices rather than through limits on consumption.

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