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Is the Facebook Brand Page Now Dead?

One thing was notably absent from last week’s F8 conference, any discussion of Facebook Pages and how these might change. To date these have looked very similar to individual’s profiles but with the launch of the new Timeline, these now have diverged dramatically. There’s no nice way of saying this – Facebook Pages now look old and behind the times compared with the new Timeline.

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What F8 and the Changes to Facebook Mean for Brands and Marketers

The announcements at yesterday’s F8 conference included a few of the changes we expected to Facebook (the music service was a very poorly kept secret) and a few more radical changes that went further than we might have guessed. For brands and for social media agencies working with Facebook, now is the time to begin to digest and understand what this means about how people will use the social network in different ways and what this means for them.

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Why People Don’t Want To Follow You on Twitter or Like You on Facebook

This morning I presented on the importance of remembering the people involved in social media – who you are engaging and what they want from you. When brands struggle on Facebook or Twitter it is usually because they haven’t thought through what is in it for the people they are engaging. It is easy as a brand to decide how you want to use social media, and what you want people to do. It is less easy, but more important, to consider what the people you are engaging want to do.

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Majority of Britons Now Use Facebook or Twitter (statistics)

The latest data from the Office of National Statistics n the UK shows that, for the first time ever, over half of adults accessed social networking sites in 2011. The annual British Internet Habits survey showed that in 2011, 57% of over-16s in the UK are using the internet for social networking, as opposed to 43% in 2010. This is a significant landmark, and the rate of growth is impressive and it shows the importance of social networking in the lives of British adults.

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Can Facebook Work for Brands?

All this summer we have been looking at the effectiveness of Facebook for a variety of big brand customers.

Here is what we have discovered, and for Facebook it doesn’t make pretty reading.

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Designing for Social Norms (or How Not to Create Angry Mobs)

In his seminal book “Code”, Larry Lessig argued that social systems are regulated by four forces: 1) the market; 2) the law; 3) social norms; and 4) architecture or code. In thinking about social media systems, plenty of folks think about monetization. Likewise, as issues like privacy pop up, we regularly see legal regulation become a factor. And, of course, folks are always thinking about what the code enables or not.
 
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5 Changes to Facebook Pages and Places To Help Global Brands

Guest Post by: Jo Stratmann

On 13th July Facebook will be launching new Pages and Places functionality to enhance the existing parent-child Page structure.

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Can Google+ Rival Facebook and Twitter? Some Initial Thoughts

Guest Post by: Hamid Sirhan

It’s too early to tell whether or not Google+, the company’s challenger to Facebook, will find success. Google’s Documents and Apps have seen widespread use, yet other services have struggled, like Wave. Early feedback suggests that from a user perspective, Google+ is getting some things right, but is not yet a solid package or a true rival to Facebook or Twitter.

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Twitter Vs. Facebook: Which Is Better for Driving Purchase Activity?

Compete recently published a blog post called Four Things You Might Not Know About Twitter. Based on its consumer data, Compete concluded that:

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Facebook, Facial Recognition & ‘Opt out’ Privacy Settings: Clever, Creepy or Both?

Guest Post by: Jo Stratmann

Now might be a good time to check your Facebook privacy settings as it appears that Facebook has rolled out its new auto facial recognition feature without giving users any notice.

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