trust

Millennials Are the Most Trusting (Gullible?) When It Comes to Advertising

This analysis from Nielsen is amusing.

The global survey found that trust levels in advertising have remained consistent across earned, owned and paid formats over the past two years.

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How To Build Trust, Even With Your Enemies

Everybody likes to operate in an environment of trust. When you deal with people you trust, things get done faster, stress is reduced and new opportunities open up. As E.M. Forster once wrote, “One must be fond of people and trust them if one is not to make a mess of life.”

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Trust Isn't About Keeping Score

How is low trust impacting your organization? Your business results? 

I've written about trust at least a dozen times in the past. In response to my recent post, A Culture of Distrust, Richard Fagerlin reached out to me about his book Trustology: The Art and Science of Leading High-Trust Teams. He wanted to get my thoughts on his stance on trust.

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A Culture of Distrust

What does a culture of distrust look like?

I've written a lot about trust in my blog over the last several years, much of it devoted to how it relates to the customer experience and customer relationships; there have been a few posts about trust and the employee experience, as well. But I think it's time to punctuate this latter thought.

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Big Data, Trust and ‘You as The Product’

If you’re not paying for it, you’re the product. Most people know this. The basis of the business model is that your personal data is mined and shared with all kinds of companies that can use this data for their benefit. Mostly this data is used to sell advertising space or intelligence to improve advertising efficiency.

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Maybe The Experience Doesn’t Matter (That Much)

EY (is it not called Ernst & Young anymore?) released its 2014 Global Consumer Banking Survey recently. For a better review of it than I’ll provide here, see the summary on The Financial Brand, or download the report directly.

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Transparency Leads to Well-Informed Participation

Does your company operate with a culture of transparency? How transparent are your executives with employees, customers, shareholders? 

There's a quote on Wikipedia that reads: For well-informed participation to occur, it is argued that some version of transparency, e.g. radical transparency, is necessary, but not sufficient. It's unattributed, but I've seen it a few times.

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Hidden Factories and Open Kitchens: Why Transparency Underpins Corporate Reputation

A fertilizer plant blows up, killing at least 14 people who were unaware, along with regulators, that the facility stored vast quantities of explosive material. A fast-food chicken chain invites everyone to take impromptu walkthrough tours of any of its outlet kitchens. These two recent events illustrate the extremes of corporate transparency (both companies are privately-held), and why it needs to be central to our conception of corporate reputation.

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Extreme Trust: Can Honesty Be a Means of Competitive Advantage? (part II)

I value what Don Peppers and Martha Rogers write and as such I am making my way through their latest book (Extreme Trust) and using it to write a series of posts on matters that are touched upon by Don and Martha. In the first post I set out the bigger picture – why trust matters, what the challenge is and how transparency will force companies to become “trustable”.

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Extreme Trust: Can Honesty Be a Means of Competitive Advantage? (Part I)

I enjoy reading what Don Peppers and Martha Rogers write. In fact their point of view spoke to me in such a way that it called me to join up and become a part of The Peppers & Rogers Group, for a while, back in 2000. Don and Martha have published a new book Extreme Trust. In this series of posts on trust I am going to share with you, comment upon and explore topics that are addressed by Don and Martha in their book.

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