shopping behaviour

The Hungry Customer

by: Roger Dooley

Food marketers love hungry customers as they are certainly in a state where tantalizing images may be particularly effective. Oddly, it turns out that hungry people may take in all kinds of information more quickly. The New York Times recently reported on the findings of Yale researchers in Empty-Stomach Intelligence:

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children influenced nearly half of all US household spending in 2005

by: Lynette Webb

This is one of those things that’s common knowledge, but it’s still nice when you stumble across some numbers (or at least educated estimates) to reinforce.

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DowntownWomensClub.com Survey

by: Dick Stroud 

DowntownWomensClub.com, a women’s network and career website, surveyed 500+ businesswomen across three generations about their shopping habits, both online and off.

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Low-price Companies Change Consumer Behaviour Permanently

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E-Monday

by: Dick Stroud 

This blog posting is not specific to the 50-plus, other than their contribution as online consumers.

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latest hazard is clicking under the influence

by: Lynette Webb 

 Click image to enlarge.

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Warranties, Neuromarketing, and Neuroeconomics

by: Roger Dooley

There’s a neuromarketing lesson in extended warranties. If you have purchased any kind of electronic product in the last few years, you were almost certainly offered an opportunity to extend the product’s warranty.

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Architecting Retail Environments for Consumer 'Trickery'

by:  David Polinchock

Many of these techniques are not exactly new, but an interesting post has surfaced on the self-proclaimed "troublemaker" website spacehijackers, about architectural techniques used in the construction of retail spaces that are purported to "trick" the consumer into buying more.

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Neuroeconomics, Asymmetric Paternalism, and Marketing

by: Roger Dooley

How can neuroscience inform marketing? One example comes from the increasingly hot field of neuroeconomics: a practice called asymmetric paternalism.

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Marketing to the Teen Brain

by: Roger Dooley

Any parent whose kids have reached teenage years can tell you that teens think differently than adults. Now, neuroscientists are finding just how differently the teen brain works.

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