shopping behaviour

Selling the Unsellable

by: Roger Dooley

Can you imagine a more difficult marketing task than selling books written by long-dead authors like Plutarch or Pliny the Younger to middle-class Americans? To make the challenge even more difficult, the books are priced well above most hardcover books, and you have to sell not just a few volumes to each customer but dozens and dozens.

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Pheromones Encourage Shopping

by: Ilya Vedrashko

Found this news article back from January 2004 while browsing Live-Scent.com forums:

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Future: Technology Recognizes Shopping Intent

by: Ilya Vedrashko

With military technology having a way of trickling down to civilian uses, this piece from the New Scientist Tech (paid sub) sounds interesting:

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Wine and the Spillover Effect

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Forget simplicity, how about a big dose of chaos?

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The Niche of Mass

by: C. Sven Johnson

Joel Greenberg has a blog entry (Link) worth reading regarding Suzanne Vega’s upcoming concert inside Second Life. Some of what he’s getting at has come up here before (reLink). And of course scarcity is something I’m often thinking about, given my particular interests.

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Product Contagion

I recall the first mega-store that opened locally - it happened to be a Meijer store, though now Super Wal-Marts, Super Targets, and other stores that sell everything are common.

It was interesting to watch what other shoppers had in their carts as they checked out - a gallon of milk, a floor mop, khaki slacks, and a chainsaw… one could start a creative writing contest in which entrants had to write a story based on shopping carts full of disparate items.

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Adventures in shoplifting

by: Dominic Basulto

Who knew? Apparently, the opposite of "shoplifting" is "shopdropping." According to The Consumerist, shopdropping is when people print out "improved" labels at home and attach them to items in retail stores.

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Simple Marketing for Complex Products

by: Roger Dooley

The more complex a decision is, the more thought and deliberation it requires, right? As intuitive and seemingly obvious as that statement seems, new research shows that it’s not true, at least in some kinds of situations.

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Polaroid and Word of Mouth

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