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Debating Privacy in a Networked World for the WSJ

Earlier this week, the Wall Street Journal posted excerpts from a debate between me, Stewart Baker, Jeff Jarvis, and Chris Soghoian on privacy. In preparation for the piece, they had us respond to a series of questions. Jeff posted the full text of his responses here. Now it’s my turn. Here are the questions that I was asked and my responses.

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"Steve Jobs" Is Currently Mentioned Online Once Every 2563 Words

Lexicalist calls itself a demographic dictionary of modern american english. What it does is analyse millions of words in online chatter on blogs, Twitter and other social networking sites and spews out information about who's using a certain word or keyword - breaking information down to age, gender and geography in the US (They also have a China version.)

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Measuring Our Way to Future Success

Are our blinders keeping us from seeing new opportunities, and / or following our customers as they move on online? How are we measuring online activities, and is this limiting our perspective.

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The Unintended Consequences of Cyberbullying Rhetoric

We all know that teen bullying – both online and offline – has devastating consequences. Jamey Rodemeyer’s suicide is a tragedy. He was tormented for being gay. He knew he was being bullied and he regularly talked about the fact that he was being bullied.

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5 Examples Where Social Media Jeopardised Online Reputation

Guest Post by: Jon Stokes

According to Warren Buffet “it takes 20 years to build a reputation and five minutes to ruin it”. With the rise of social media it feels like it can take  less than five minutes to potentially damage your online reputation.

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Innovation in Market Research (with Audio Track)

Here is one of my latest presentations on the status and the future of online research including the audio track in order to make it easier to understand where I’m coming from. Duration: 40 minutes, sharp!

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Topical Storms Brewing around Influence

On the heels of our influence panel at Mesh 2011, Klout has introduced a new feature they call "+K". A simple way to think of it is a like button for influence which connects someone to a topic which you choose. The move by Klout to add this feature signifies a broader effort which impacts conversations on the subject matter of digital influence—that influence is meaningless unless you have context such as what subject(s) people and organizations are credible in.

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How Teens Understand Privacy

In the fall, Alice Marwick and I went into the field to understand teens’ privacy attitudes and practices. We’ve blogged some of our thinking since then but we’re currently working on turning our thinking into a full-length article.
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You Saw It on the News... But Probably Not the Printed Kind

A new report on the US media has confirmed what we already know – that most of us are now getting our daily news fix online and on mobile devices.

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43% of News Sharing Online Is via Social Media (CNN Research)

A study by CNN of how we share and consume news has found that social media is the most frequent way that we share stories online. In their study of 2,300 people over two months they found that social media was used to share news in 43% of all instances. Higher than email, which was the second most frequent method of sharing, with 30% of all instances. SMS was third (with 15% of instances) and instant messenger 4th (12%).

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