neuroscience

7 Ways To Be the Most Interesting Person in Any Room, and More – Roger’s Picks

Consider this a double-dose of Roger’s Picks since we missed the previous week’s wrap-up… And, if YOU found a compelling article or blog post this week, add it in a comment!

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Ariely for Free, Getting Unstuck, Placebos, and More – Roger’s Picks

Another week, another few hundred articles and blog posts scanned… here’s a diverse group of stuff you may find particularly interesting.

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Video Game Improves Multitasking Skills

Does multitasking seem to be getting tougher for you as the years pass? In fact, that’s quite normal. By the time you are 40, multitasking is nearly twice as challenging as when you were 20. The good news is that playing a video game has just been shown to improve cognitive function and, in particular, multitasking ability in healthy older adults. Adults subjects from 60 to 85 years old became as effective at multitasking as 20 year-olds after just a month of training, according to a new UCSF study.

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CMU Study Identifies Emotions from Brain Activity

One of the ongoing controversies in neuromarketing is how well current techniques can identify specific emotions. While there’s general agreement that attention and emotional engagement can be tracked, identifying specific emotions with confidence has been elusive. Now, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have published a new study showing the ability to identify emotions with an accuracy “well above chance” using fMRI.

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Manifestos > Mission Statements in a Connected Age – 5 Reasons Why, 10 Faves and 12 Tips to Write Them Well

Now I’m going to count to 5, could you please tell me what the guiding vision/direction of your company is …right…NOW…5,4,3,2,1…. Awwww, too bad, I was so hoping you could play it back to me.

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Bigger Brain = Social Media Success

Hiring a social media manager or a salesperson? Maybe you should have the finalists’ brains scanned in an fMRI.

A larger orbital prefrontal cortex, an area of the brain associated with decision-making and cognitive processing, has been shown to correlate with greater social skills, according to a study by a team of UK researchers. Among the scientists was Robin Dunbar, who pioneered the idea that the average human is limited to a social circle of about 150 people (see Your Brain’s Twitter Limit: 150 Real Friends), a constant now known as the Dunbar number.

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The Internet's Battle For Our Digital Souls

Harvard neuroscience researchers have just confirmed what many of us have suspected all along: social networks like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest are “brain candy” for Internet users. Every status update, every tweet, every pin is a micro-jolt delivered squarely to the pleasure centers of our brains. We get approximately the same type of pleasure from talking about ourselves on social media as we do from having sex. As Facebook bulks up to take on new challengers after its much-anticipated IPO next week, is it possible that the battle for future dominance on the Internet will actually take place inside our heads?

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How Brain Science Turns Browsers into Buyers: SXSW Recap

If you were one of the many folks at SXSW who weren’t able to get into the room to view Sunday’s SXSW panel, How Brain Science Turns Browsers into Buyers, or if you weren’t at SXSW at all, here’s a recap. (If you were turned away at the door, or had to sit on the floor, please accept our apologies. We don’t pick the venue, and this year SXSW put branding and neuromarketing panels in smallish rooms at the Intercontinental.

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More Evidence Video Games Help Your Brain

There’s more evidence that playing video games can improve your brain in ways that go beyond an ability to get higher scores in those games:

People who played action-based video and computer games made decisions 25% faster than others without sacrificing accuracy, according to a study.

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Your Brain on Video Games (Infographic)

Gaming companies know a lot about how to light up your brain – to be successful, a game has to be engaging from the start and addictive enough to keep the player coming back. Some video game makers have employed neuromarketing technology to test aspects of game play. We rarely do infographic posts here, but this is one that might be interesting to our readers:

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