Here’s the most interesting content we found this week, followed by my own content here, at Forbes.com, and at The Brainfluence Podcast.

Want to boost your conversion rates? Use psychology. Ritika Puri (@ritika_puri) has compiled a list of in-depth resources at Unbounce to help you apply the principles of persuasion to your website in 10 Conversion Psychology Resources That Will Make You a Smarter Marketer. (By the way, I’ll be doing a totally free webinar via Unbounce – register now for 5 Neuromarketing Techniques to Persuade Customers to Convert.)

Your potential customers have to see your brand or product to be persuaded to buy it, right? Maybe not. In a study conducted by students from the University of Arizona, as explained in a Science Daily (@ScienceDaily) article, things outside a person’s visual focus can still change behavior. Read Don’t underestimate your mind’s eye: Objects don’t need to be seen to impact decision-making to learn more.

The sentiment for neuromarketing seems to wax and wane depending on what’s in the news, but Rohit Chat (@Ro_Chat) makes a case for it in Why Neuromarketing Matters. There’s a nice shoutout for Brainfluence in that article, too.

Most of us would like to be more influential. The good news is that it doesn’t always take a massive effort. Aleks Srbinoski (@AleksPsych) shares 10 Keys to Persuasion – Instantly Become More Influential Through Little Acts that Make a Big Difference. Some will be familiar, I’m sure, but a reminder of what you should be doing is always valuable.

The Marshmallow Test is the famous experiment that showed children who seek instant gratification are less successful as adults than kids with more self control. Ed Batista (@edbatista) challenges adults to try The Marshmallow Test for Grownups. Ed offers an interesting perspective on how technology is testing our self control and what we can do about it.

What’s the Next Big Thing? It may well be “The Internet of Things.” Gordon Hui (@gordonhui) shows how when everything talks to everything else, marketing and other areas will see dramatic changes. This new world is coming fast – see if you agree with Gordon’s analysis in How the Internet of Things Changes Business Models.

My Stuff

In Two Words That Change How People Think of You, I look at some new research that shows how a simple expression can actually make other people think more favorably of you. Start using this simple but underutilized technique today!

In this week’s Brainfluence Podcast, we welcome Anna Simpson (@_annasimpson) to our show, all the way from Singapore. She’s a futurist who talks about the correlation of luxury and sustainability, as well as shows brands how to focus on key elements of customer desire. Listen or read: Episode #24 – What Your Customers Really Desire with Anna Simpson.

What’s in a name? If you are a regular customer of Starbucks, you have probably had at least one encounter when the barista spelled your name wrong. This was given a hilarious treatment by video producer Paul Gale (@ImPaulGale) – his short video has garnered more than 7 million views. There’s method to Starbucks’s madness, though, as I describe in my Forbes post Starbucks Personalization – Evil, Funny, Or Brilliant?

In case you missed last week’s picks… Learn more about productivity from Dan Ariely, why the sales funnel may be obsolete, the scientific way to get more social shares, and more, in Ariely’s Productivity Secret, Zarrella Dissects Instagram… Roger’s Picks.

Of course, feel free to add your own great find in a comment!

Original Post: http://www.neurosciencemarketing.com/blog/articles/conversion-psych-starbucks-picks.htm    

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