For many, there is a desperation for a “Like”. As one of the planners said here the other day, if someone asked you “do you like me?” in every single conversation, you would probably hit them or think they were a bit weird. 2010 has certainly be the year of the “Like” and fortunately, in 2011 sensible people will be trying to put a value on what this actually means.

In a few conversations I have had, people talk about loyalty when they talk about a “Like”, some even talk about “intent to purchase”. A lot of these people do not know what they are talking about. Loyalty to a brand cannot be defined as a “Like” especially when these people that like the page “believe this “loyalty” should be rewarded with discounts and vouchers”. Loyalty has never been defined by people looking for a great deal, because when this great deal goes… so does the user.

A “Like” for me is nothing more than an intent to participate. It is not a participation itself, it is an intent to participate if you the brand, the product, give me a genuine reason to participate further. Yes, the “Like” opens up a socialCRM channel for brands, but why is this valuable if these people are not actively participating in your community. So for me, brands should be thinking about how we convert an intent to participate to actual participation (commenting, liking content, responding, uploading, activating, shooting). When they have nailed this, then surely the next step is understanding actual value of a participating like and actual value of a non-participating like.

After all, this is what it looks like when someone really does “Like” your brand

I’d be interested in hearing how your brands and businesses value the “Like”. Respond in the comments below.

Original Post: http://digigen.co.uk/2011/02/09/why-the-like-button-is-less-valuable-than-you-think/