by: David Polinchock

Is it possible that sometimes we just expect too much in this connected, fast moving world? During last year's Motrin controversy, one of the main complaints was that no one responded over the weekend. To people complaining about an ad they didn't like.

And now, they complaining that they haven't updated the White House web site with enough new content, two days after moving into the office. Is it possible that they're busy doing some other things that just might be more important, like maybe trying to figure out how to get us out of this economic crisis that we're in? Or figuring out how to make the bailout program work. Or how to get us out of two wars?

Just because we can complain about things 24/7, does that mean we should? This is clearly the downside to our net connected, twittering world. We're in such a rush ourselves, that we expect everything done instantly. Sometimes we need to let people work at a different pace. It's not like the web site hasn't been updated in months, it's been two days. I mean, come on folks, let's lighten up a little bit.

Indeed, as the Post points out, Obama's sleek new White House Web site is looking pretty weak right now, with only five posts (as of Thursday morning) on the official White House blog (including a "Hello World" post and a video of Obama's inaugural address, minus comments), a couple of executive orders, no pool reports, old bios and agenda items from the campaign, and a standard "Contact Us" Web form.

My favorite: The list of Cabinet appointments, all displayed in a basic HTML table circa 1996.

White House stuck in "technological dark ages" : Ben Patterson : Yahoo! Tech .

Original Post: http://blog.brandexperiencelab.org/experience_manifesto/2009/01/white-house-stuck-in-technological-dark-ages-ben-patterson-yahoo-tech------indeed-as-the-post-points-out-obamas.html

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