by: Karl Long

Why not make commercials that people want to watch, ads that people seek out, send to friends, discuss. A nice article on the New York Times talks about this in a piece called Commercials Find New Life on Web:

Like the generation of Americans that traded baseball cards, Internet users often swap television commercials, e-mailing them back and forth. By making their commercials available, advertisers hope to replicate, if on a much smaller scale, the online success that Anheuser-Busch had with its commercials from this year’s Super Bowl.
 
“The best compliment you can get these days is if you create an ad entertaining enough that people want to virally share it and pass it on,” said Karen Jones, the vice president for brand advertising and promotion for DHL. “Everybody just wants to see what’s happening. The more entertaining and creative your spots are, the more people want to engage with them.”

In the end advertising is content, if it’s good people watch it, and if it sucks people ignore it…. unless it sucks so much people send it on to friends :-)

On a related note, this is what bud.tv is trying to capitalize on, that advertising is content, and in many ways companies can become sponsors in the real sense of the word, patrons of the advertising arts. Brand Autopsy has written recently on this, and thinks they are setting themselves up for failure:

So we are saying: ‘Can we be in six months what YouTube is?’ Bud.TV is unknown today, but with our marketing and awareness programs that reach is not an unreasonable objective for the first 90 days.
 

This is a quote from an interview with Tony Ponturo, VP of Global Media & Sports Marketing in a wall street journal article.

He has lost his mind if he thinks bud.tv is going to get close to youtube in 90 days.

Anyway, i’m just off to get on a plane, liquid and gel free i might add, to Boston for the weekend. I tell you, when you feel like Palm Beach Airport is the central front in terror the terrorists have truly won.

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