research

More Decoys: Compromise Marketing

Why a logical product lineup may not be the most profitable

When marketers plan a company’s product offerings, they usually try to do so in the most logical way possible. Several levels of product may be offered - a stripped-down, basic version, a more capable better version, and perhaps a “best” version. These would normally be priced at quite different levels, probably based in part on the relative manufacturing costs of the products.

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Bad Bosses Are Killers

by: Roger Dooley

A few weeks ago I created a new category here, “Neuromanagement,” which fits a couple of posts I’ve got simmering on the back burner. While those are geared toward the positive use of neuro-techniques in managing and hiring, there’s a breaking news story about the dangerous physiological effects of bad management. Bloomberg writer Frances Schwartzkopff reports:

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Research about Digital Europe

by: Dick Stroud

A couple of big meaty research reports were published last week about all things digital.

EIAA Mediascope Europe 2008 tells you all you want to know about why people are using digital stuff. It is particularly useful if you want to know what 25-34 year olds are doing online. The 35+ are grouped into ‘other’.

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Living and Learning with New Media: Findings from a 3-year Ethnographic Study of Digital Youth

by: danah boyd

For the last three years, I've been a part of a team of researchers at Berkeley and USC focused on digital youth practices. This project, funded by the MacArthur Foundation, brought together 28 different researchers (led by Mimi Ito and my now deceased advisor Peter Lyman) to examine different aspects of American youth life. As many of you know, I focused on normative teen practices and the ways in which teens engaged in networked publics. We are now prepared to share our findings:

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Be Careful Using Consumer Confidence Measures

by: Dick Stroud

Marketing Week has an article about the age and regional variation in the TNS/Nationwide consumer confidence measure (Nationwide Consumer Confidence Index). This is the measure most often quoted in the UK – something similar to the Conference Board in the US.

The article focuses on the changes in this index during the past 3 quarters and what it tells us about the way that different age groups react to our present financial Armageddon.

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Helping Others Makes You Hot!

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LiveJournal Academic Research Bibliography

by: danah boyd

Alice Marwick has recently put together a topical, semi-annotated bibliography of academic research on LiveJournal: LiveJournal Academic Research Bibliography. She has tried to surface all known scholarly research concerning LiveJournal. This bibliography was commissioned by LiveJournal (where I'm on the advisory board and played a role in making this happen). This is a great resource for all scholars who are interested in LJ-related issues.

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Now Google Wants Our Brains

by: Roger Dooley

Those of us in the web marketing and search arena both love and fear Google. Google, directly or indirectly, makes us money and can send our sites millions of visitors; on the other hand, Google knows a LOT about us. Their Toolbar, Analytics, Adsense, Gmail, and, of course, Search are all happily gathering petabytes of data about our behavior. Now, Google is employing neuromarketing technology to peer inside our brains:

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The Ethics of Ethics

by: Jonathan Salem Baskin

Consumers are willing to pay more for ethically produced products, according to a study published in yesterday's Wall Street Journal and the MIT/Sloan Management Review.

The researchers, both Canadian academics, defined "socially responsible" companies as those which are:

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Buyology by Martin Lindstrom

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